The World Health Organization estimates that nearly 422 million people worldwide have diabetes mellitus. There are many people who have undiagnosed diabetes and do not know the health risks that they face every day. However, understanding your diagnosis of diabetes type 1 or diabetes type 2, makes you much more equipped to care for your own health.

Bad habits are an innate part of every person’s life.  We all struggle in some way to change or break behaviors that we know do not serve us well. Unfortunately, some people are not even aware of their own bad habits and vices. 

For patients with diabetes, breaking bad habits can drastically change their physical and mental health. 

Are you looking to figure out your own bad habits? Do you want to change your behavior to set you up for success in the best ways possible?

Let’s start with the basics.

What is Diabetes?

Most people know that eating foods high in carbohydrates and high in sugars can lead a person to develop prediabetes or type 2 diabetes mellitus. 

The reason for such a phenomenon is that when a person consumes large amounts of sugars and carbohydrates frequently, their body begins to become insulin resistant. Insulin is the pancreatic hormone that the body uses to break down carbohydrates and sugars into glucose stores. 

Glucose is then transferred from the bloodstream into the body tissue, facilitated again by insulin. Such glucose stores act as stored energy, so if a person exercises or exerts themselves (or is in a situation of starving for a few days), the body can utilize these stores to thrive and survive.

However, when the body receives many more carbohydrates and sugars than it needs, insulin starts to fail. This is called insulin resistance. Your body becomes less sensitive to the need to transfer glucose into the tissues, and therefore glucose stays in the bloodstream.

Glucose= broken down sugars.

Failure of glucose to leave the bloodstream due to lack of insulin/insulin resistance= diabetes.

Therefore, this is why people with diabetes end up having high blood sugar AKA high blood glucose. 

Unhealthy Eating Habits

BAD: Inconsistent Eating Habits

Skipping meals is one of the more dangerous habits of diabetes management. A person with diabetes most likely follows a prescribed medication regimen to control blood sugar (prescribed synthetic insulin or anti-diabetes pills). These medications lower a person’s blood sugar. 

When a person with diabetes skips a meal, especially skipping breakfast, their blood sugar significantly drops. Blood sugar already drops while we sleep. Furthermore, blood sugar will drop even more when that person takes their morning diabetes medication.

The combination of factors can lead to a severely low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia, and cause multiple side effects: shakiness, weakness, headache, slurred speech, confusion, seizures, and even coma or death. 

Furthermore, binge eating can have the opposite effect. Binge eating, especially at night, can lead to high blood sugar spikes. In the most severe cases, high blood sugar leads to diabetic ketoacidosis and needs to be treated at a hospital.

GOOD: Snacking Occasionally Instead

Rather than skipping any meal completely, it is better to have a healthy snack. The snack can be small if you are not hungry. Try a healthy snack instead: veggies and hummus, almonds or cashews, hard-boiled eggs, trail mix, edamame, or peanut butter with celery sticks/apples. 

Snacking can also prevent binge-eating because it reduces your cravings. Trying to maintain strong willpower, a positive and optimistic mood, and remembrance of your healthy food goals will also help you curb binge-eating.

Female holding celery

BAD: Drinks that are High in Sugar

This is a very difficult bad habit to break: the consumption of delicious, sugar-y drinks. Sadly, soda, milkshakes, slushies, sweetened coffee drinks, sweetened iced tea, and even sweetened lemonade can be dangerous for diabetics and prediabetics. 

Most drinks from fast food joints are loaded with high fructose corn syrup, which greatly increases the risk of diabetes and diabetes complications.

A typical 12-ounce can of soda has 30+ grams of carbohydrates (derived from high fructose corn syrup, leading to 30+ grams of sugar too). A Lipton Iced Tea can contain 45+ grams. A Wetzel’s Pretzel’s lemonade can contain 50 grams. A medium blended Frappuccino or frappe can contain upwards of 50+ grams. 

In comparison, a kit kat contains 27 grams carbs (a Kit Kat mini contains 8 grams). Drinking sugar-y drinks can literally account for double the carb/sugar intake of a candy bar.

These sugar-filled drinks also provide nearly no nutritional value, meaning they lack good vitamins and minerals. They can be difficult for the kidneys to filter over time. And alternative drinks can be similarly satiating. 

GOOD: Replace with Water and Low-Sugar Drinks

So what alternatives should you look for?

While water is widely considered the best drink to consume (highly valuable to our bodies, easy to process and filter, cheap, and hydrating), water does not need to be your 24/7 drink. You can still enjoy many drinks that are low in fructose and low in carbohydrates.

One such alternative is seltzer waters. These waters, such as LaCro